Measurement and (In)Accuracy in Standardized Testing and Value Added Measures

Readings/Resources:


CREATE. Testing Today in Context: History, Impact, and Alternatives
Full PDF:


En español


CREATE: HIGHLIGHTS of Research Brief #1: Testing Today in Context: History, Impact, and Alternatives
Full PDF:


En español


Rothstein, J. (2009). Student sorting and bias in value-added estimation: Selection on observables and unobservables. Education Finance and Policy, 4(4), 537-571).


Amrein-Beardsley, A. (2008). Methodological concerns about the education value-added assessment system. Educational Researcher, 37(2), 65-75.



Braun, H., Chudowsky, N., & Koenig, J. (Eds). (2010). Getting Value Out of Value-Added: Report of a Workshop. National Research Council and National Academy of Education. The National Academies Press: Washington, D.C.

Description: Value-added methods refer to efforts to estimate the relative contributions of specific teachers, schools, or programs to student test performance. In recent years, these methods have attracted considerable attention because of their potential applicability for educational accountability, teacher pay-for-performance systems, school and teacher improvement, program evaluation, and research. Value-added methods involve complex statistical models applied to test data of varying quality. Accordingly, there are many technical challenges to ascertaining the degree to which the output of these models provides the desired estimates. Despite a substantial amount of research over the last decade and a half, overcoming these challenges has proven to be very difficult, and many questions remain unanswered--at a time when there is strong interest in implementing value-added models in a variety of settings.